Textile news

NOVEMBER 2016

  Book of the Month

aaa_textile-collage

Textile Collage: Using Collage Techniques in Textile Art by Mandy Pattullo, 2016, 128 pages with color illustrations throughout—yet another stimulating publication from Batsford, a fiber-friendly U.K. publisher. Pattullo begins her introduction with a quotation from collage artist Kurt Schwitters, situating her book within an art milieu. Encouraging artists to repurpose antique and vintage textiles, including old quilts that have seen better days, the author discusses materials, techniques, and storage, and shares advice about making portraits, garments, and artists’ books. If you are finding yourself stalled in your studio, I highly recommend Textile Collage to help get your creative engine started again.

http://www.mandypattullo.co.uk/

 

 

 

 

Hurlyburly by Orly Genger

Monumental organic forms comprise Hurlyburly, Orly Genger’s installation in Austin, Texas, on view until the end of February.     Genger, a New York-based artist, takes the domestic art of crocheting to a powerfully dynamic level, using only her hands to construct loops of thick, rough lobster rope into gigantic strands. Industrial rope became available for communities beyond fisherman several years ago when floating lines for lobsters had to be replaced by sinking rope to protect the rare right whale. This artist’s involvement with repurposed material resonates with the productions of environmental artists, and her landscape art embraces an aesthetic closer to works like the curvilinear installations of the Finnish artist and architect Marco Casagrande, notably his woven willow Sandworm on the Belgian coast. Orly Genger successfully mediates between painting and interactive sculpture, managing to create appealing constructions on a very human scale, in tune with both nature and art.

Orly Genger, Hurlyburly (detail, 2016); recycled lobster rope and paint. Dimensions variable. Presented by the Waller Creek Conservancy in collaboration with The Contemporary Austin. Installation view, Waller Delta, Austin, 2016. Artwork copyright Orly Genger. Courtesy the artist. Image courtesy The Contemporary Austin. Photo by Brian Fitzsimmons.

Orly Genger, Hurlyburly (detail, 2016); recycled lobster rope and paint. Dimensions variable. Presented by the Waller Creek Conservancy in collaboration with The Contemporary Austin. Installation view, Waller Delta, Austin, 2016. Artwork copyright Orly Genger. Courtesy the artist. Image courtesy The Contemporary Austin. Photo by Brian Fitzsimmons.

http://www.thecontemporaryaustin.org/exhibitions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Touch: The Expressive Magic of Judith James

Textile artist Judith James passed away in 2015, leaving an impressive body of work still being discovered by her husband, quilt artist Michael James. As a tribute to his wife, James has created a web site documenting her work, and is helping to assemble pieces for a solo exhibition at the New Bedford Art Museum, January 6 – March 19. Judith James describing her process: “The stitched resist dyeing techniques that I’ve been using often produce soft, slightly out-of-focus effects. These sometimes result in a kind of luminosity, or a kind of hazy glow, that suggest to me the first light of dawn or the waning light of late afternoon. This kind of light lowers visibility and softens the landscape. There’s an intimacy to even the broadest landscape in these moments. For me this connects with the intimacy of the processes and materials I use in creating these textile constructions. Throughout their making I have moments of awareness of their strength and their fragility, of their responsiveness and their resistance to those manipulation processes, and of my flip-flopping roles as both the maker and recipient of their own spontaneous and often accidental metamorphoses.”

Judith James, Folio (2004), 15.5 x 22.5 in.; screen printed, dyed, and discharged cotton, silk and Hindumoni paper; hand stitched and embroidered.

Judith James, Folio (2004), 15.5 x 22.5 in.; screen printed, dyed, and discharged cotton, silk and Hindumoni paper; hand stitched and embroidered.

http://judithjamestextileart.com/

http://newbedfordart.org/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quilts=Art=Quilts

This annual juried exhibition has become well known for the variety and quality of quilts selected. Like Quilt National, Quilts=Art=Quilts has no theme, allowing the jurors a free hand in selecting quilts for the show. The 2016 show includes works by Liz Axford, Betty Busby, Elizabeth Busch, Shin-hee Chin, Jette Clover, Judy Langille, and Janet Steadman. At the Schweinfurth Art Center in Auburn, New York, the exhibition closes on January 8. The jurors were Terry Jarrard-Dimond, Valerie Goodwin, and Judy Kirpich, who chose 65 quilts from 185 submitting artists. Goodwin shared these thoughts about jurying the show: “Judy Kirpich, Terry Jarrad-Dimond and I were honored to be selected to jury an amazing and varied array of contemporary art quilts. In the age of the Internet, the jurying process can now be done virtually while jurors are located in their respective spots on the globe. We found this new way of seeing and discussing artwork to be engaging and almost seamless. We were able to talk about color, detail, and artistic vision as if we were all in the same room. We began the jurying session after reviewing the work individually. Armed with our own thoughts and notations, we felt that an interesting discussion ensued. As we talked and became more comfortable with the process and one another, I think that we were able to select a good balance of work with strong intent, masterful craftsmanship, and aesthetic appeal.”

http://www.schweinfurthartcenter.org

Judy Langille, Ancient Composite 1 (2015), 56 x 36 in. On view in Quilts=Arts=Quilts. Photo by Peter Jacobs.

Judy Langille, Ancient Composite 1 (2015), 56 x 36 in. On view in Quilts=Arts=Quilts. Photo by Peter Jacobs.

 

 

 

 

Hope Wilmarth, Urban Cathedral (2016), 45 x 44 in. On view in Breakout: Quilt Visions 2016. Photo by Rick Wells.

Hope Wilmarth, Urban Cathedral (2016), 45 x 44 in. On view in Breakout: Quilt Visions 2016. Photo by Rick Wells.

Breakout: Quilt Visions 2016

Quilt Visions, a theme-based biennial juried exhibition, challenges the jurors as well as the artists to focus on a specific concept. For 2016, the jurors were artists Elizabeth Busch and Katie Pasquini Masopust, along with Marci Rae McDade, editor of Surface Design Journal. In response to my email inquiry, McDade had this to say about her experiences as a juror: “It was fascinating to hear how each juror was drawn to different works of art for various reasons. Months later, seeing the physical pieces in person at the opening was magical; only so much of their merits can be appreciated from photos. It was also an honor to hear so many of the artists speak about their work in person at the gallery tour. I am always keen to learn about their methods of making and inspirations compared to my preconceived notions or assumptions based on the limited information I have to judge the work. Speaking to everyone at the panel discussion about the jurying process was flattering and fun. I think everyone was pleasantly surprised by my candor when I explained that my approach to choosing provocative new works that challenge and expand the definition of a studio art quilt often hinges on figuring out if a piece is ‘edgy’ or ‘crappy’.” Amen to that! Breakout is the 14th Quilt Visions exhibition, produced by the Visions Art Museum: Contemporary Quilts + Textiles (VAM). The exhibition can be seen at the Museum in San Diego, California, until January 8.

http://www.visionsartmuseum.org

 

 

One Response to “NOVEMBER 2016”

  1. Sue Kaufman says:

    Thank you, Sandra, for another excellent compilation of current fiber art articles. I appreciate that you take the time to do it.

    Sue in Drums PA

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