Textile news

OCTOBER 2016

Book of the Month: Something Different

Preprints: Material in Motion, 10th North American Textile Conservation Conference (2015), with CD of articles and images. Texts in both Spanish and English, $30.

Preprints: Material in Motion, 10th North American Textile Conservation Conference (2015), with CD of articles and images. Texts in both Spanish and English, $30.

If you do not work with 3-D objects, knits, or feathers, this book is probably not for you. But since many of us are becoming interested in three-dimensional creations and odd materials, I want to share the extremely informative articles in this publication. The most surprising text explains the amount of stretch and actions for recovery of Patrick Kelly’s knit dresses displayed at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. For textile and fiber artists thinking of installing any type of shelter-like structure, you will learn a lot about support systems in the article on movable architecture, including Ottoman tents and George Washington’s field tent. If you are using feathers, beware of flying! An article on protecting 3-D objects during transit reveals that in airplanes the shafts of feathers can quickly become dehydrated and crack. Advice is given on how to protect them. In addition, should your work suffer damage from muddy water, an article gives professional advice on cleaning textiles in the aftermath of such a disaster.

http://www.natcconference.com/images/2015_media_files/2015_toc.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Genius of Ann Hamilton at Work in Philadelphia

Ann Hamilton: habitus installation at Municipal Pier 9, Philadelphia.

Ann Hamilton: habitus installation at Municipal Pier 9, Philadelphia.

Cloth making, among the oldest forms of human cultural production, provides inspiration for Ann Hamilton’s multi-venue project, habitus, located at three sites: The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Municipal Pier 9, and on social media. habitus weaves text, textile, and image together as mediums for an imaginative and tactile exchange between artist and audience. The museum’s galleries display Hamilton’s selection of historical objects—including literary commonplace books, textile sample books, dolls, and needlework portfolios—borrowed from Philadelphia museums and public collections. In the vast space of Municipal Pier 9 on the Delaware River, visitors propel a field of gigantic cylindrical curtains to billow to atmospheric proportion. Hamilton’s multi-venue exhibition invites us to touch and be touched by the fabric of human experience. She is an extraordinary artist whose work I have admired for decades, especially her ability to work from small to large scale with great aplomb. The pier installation closes on October 10, and The Fabric Workshop exhibition on January 8.

http://www.fabricworkshop.org

 

 

 

 Textile Dialogues at the Daum Museum of Contemporary Art

Donna Sharrett: Love and Affection (2013), 36 x 36 in.; neckties, necktie interfacing, upholstery fabric, jewelry, trimming, guitar strings and ball-ends, dirt, bone beads, buttons, synthetic hair, and thread. Photo by Margaret Fox.

Donna Sharrett: Love and Affection (2013), 36 x 36 in.; neckties, necktie interfacing, upholstery fabric, jewelry, trimming, guitar strings and ball-ends, dirt, bone beads, buttons, synthetic hair, and thread. Photo by Margaret Fox.

The Thread You Follow: Debra M. Smith and Donna Sharrett explores the work of two fiber artists who employ eclectic practices that bridge the conventional divide between crafts and fine art. Both artists repurpose found fabric in their compositions, which is painstakingly cut and stitched together to form compatible, yet distinct, bodies of work. Sharrett employs a sculptural approach to explore memory and symbolic ritual in her circular assemblages. Smith takes a more painterly interest in the arrangement of her fabric scraps, and concentrates on the formal language of shape, color, and texture in rectangular arrangements that yield a cubist-inspired graphics. Sharrett explains that her works in the show “are meditations on memory; where flowers, music and belongings serve as its repository, and are arranged within a numeric cadence inspired by the sacred geometry of Gothic cathedral rose windows, religious prayer beads, nature, and music. Guitar strings, for example, are used as a dedication to my brother, Scot Sharrett (1961-2001), as are the song titles chosen to name the works.” The museum is located in Sedalia, Missouri, and the exhibition runs until December 20.

http://www.daummuseum.org/event/the-thread-you-follow-debra-smith-and-donna-sharrett/?mode=current

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reuse of Textile Waste Celebrated by the Cooper Hewitt

Luisa Cevese Riedizioni: Bag, Large Basket (2014, textiles since 1996); silk selvedges, polyurethane. Courtesy of Luisa Cevese Riedizioni.

Luisa Cevese Riedizioni: Bag, Large Basket (2014, textiles since 1996); silk selvedges, polyurethane. Courtesy of Luisa Cevese Riedizioni.

Offering creative, alternative approaches to confronting textile waste, Scraps: Fashion, Textiles, and Creative Reuse presents the work of three designers who put sustainability at the heart of the design process: Luisa Cevese, founder of Riedzioni in Milan; Christina Kim, founder of dosa, inc., in Los Angeles; and Reiko Sudo, managing director at NUNO in Tokyo. Each designer’s practice involves innovative and sophisticated reuse of textile materials and resources, while engaging in preservation of local craft traditions. Through more than forty works, the exhibition explores key facets of sustainability, such as the efficient use of materials and resources, the preservation of local craft traditions and the integration of new technologies in the recycling process. Amazingly, these designers are finding that reusing textile scraps can be financially viable. Their ingenuity is impressive. On view in New York until April 16.

http://www.cooperhewitt.org/channel/scraps/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Can you believe that the “Summer of Love” happened nearly 50 years ago?

Therese May: The Spirit of the Dream (1999), 71 x 71 in.; studio art quilt. Photo by Richard Johns.

Therese May: The Spirit of the Dream (1999), 71 x 71 in.; studio art quilt. Photo by Richard Johns.

 

The San Jose Museum of Quilts and Textiles (California) brings us The California Art Quilt Revolution: From the Summer of Love to the New Millennium, with more than 40 works. In the final decades of the 20th century, California quilt makers charted new territory in the art form, leading the nation in creativity and innovation. During the 1970s and 1980s, California artists were among the first to embrace the quilt medium as their primary means of expression. More traditional quilters also expanded their horizons, creating original designs based on traditional quilt patterns. This exhibition includes works by pioneers of the art quilt movement, including Therese May, Jean Ray Laury, Yvonne Porcella, and Joan Schulze, who pushed the boundaries of what could be called a quilt, and highlights late 20th– and 21st-century artists working in contemporary quilt art. Therese May recalls that summer: I loved the “Summer of Love!” That was in 1967, the summer we moved from Wisconsin to California so my husband could teach at San Jose State University. Being in the San Francisco Bay area at this time was both inspiring and mind blowing! I met many artists, such as David Gilhooly, who made breakthrough art in ceramic sculpture, and Maija Peeples, whose paintings were colorful, funny Funk Art. I was innocently working in the cloth medium, not knowing what a big deal it was until much later!” Organized by Nancy Bavor, Curator of Collections, this exhibition opens on October 7 and closes on January 15.

http://www.sjquiltmuseum.org/upcoming-exhibitions/

 

 

 

 

As many of you know, I am the curator for the Texas Quilt Museum, involved with exhibitions and educational programming. To celebrate our FIFTH YEAR(!) we have launched a fundraising campaign via the Generosity platform of IndieGoGo, in which the Museum receives all funds donated. It would be so very nice if you could donate a little to help raise funds for our educational programming. This blog has 700 subscribers, and $5 from each of you would nearly reach our goal! (Thanks once again to those who have already donated.) The web site for our campaign is:

https://www.generosity.com/education-fundraising/educational-programs-from-the-texas-quilt-museum–2

 

 

 

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